French Cinema Final Exam

French Cinema Final Exam

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400 Blows
Francois Truffaut, 1959
Jules and Jim
Francois Truffaut, 1961
Breathless (A Bout de Souffle)
Jean-Luc Godard, 1959
Pierrot le Fou
Jean-Luc Godard, 1965
Cleo from 5 to 7
Agnes Varda, 1962
Vagabond
Agnes Varda, 1985
Murmur of the Heart
Louise Malle, 1971
La Ceremonie
Claude Chabrol, 1995
Diva
Jean-Jacques Beneix, 1981
Jean de Florette & Manon des Sources
Claude Berri, 1986
La Femme Nikita
Luc Besson, 1991
I Can’t Sleep (J’ai Pas Sommeil)
Claire Denis, 1999
French Twist
Josiane Balasko, 1996
MicMacs
Jean-Pierre Jeunet, 2009
Of Gods and Men
Xavier Beauvois, 2010
La Haine
Matthieu Kassovitz, 1995
Auteur Theory
Hypothesis that a movie is given its essential identity by one person: the director. Film exhibits as well the distinctive signature of its auteur and may be profitably studied as such.
CINEMA VERITE
A documentary style that arose in the 1960s and which emphasized real events captured usually with a handheld camera (the effects of which create a moving, jumpy, easily identifiable visual style)
DIEGESIS
The fictional world of the film, the « actual » world of the film’s story created by its narrative. It includes events that are presumed to have occurred and actions and spaces not shown onscreen. A “non-diegetical” element is one that is not part of the film’s world.
DISSOLVE
When an image slowly disappears from the screen, replaced by another subsequent image which is momentarily superimposed upon it.
ESTABLISHING SHOT
An opening shot of a film or a film sequence intended to reveal (often with the use of titles) the local in which the film or film sequence will take place.
FRAME
The border of a single exposed image.
GENRE
An identifiable type or form of film
HAND-HELD CAMERA
A camera held by a cameraman (not on a tripod or a dolly), creating a moving, jumpy, easily identifiable visual style. Highly prized in cinema verite
IRIS
An opening or closing circle which either reveals or occludes the images in a frame.
JUMP CUT
A very rapid cut from one image to another.
JUXTAPOSITION
In a film, the contiguous positioning of either two images, characters, objects, or two scenes in sequence, in order to compare and contrast them, or establish a relationship between them
MISE EN SCENE
All those aspects of a movie that pertain to arrangement of an image in a frame.
MONTAGE
The rapid juxtaposition of images, cutting from one to another to create an effect.
MOTIF
An element–incident, device, reference, formula––which recurs frequently in a work or works.
NARRATION
When an off-screen, extra-diegetic voice speaks to us in a movie.
NARRATIVE
Story telling
NONSYNCHRONOUS SOUND
Sound that does not have a visible source in the film’s diegesis.
POINT-OF-VIEW
The perceptual or conceptual position in terms of which the narrated situations and events are presented.
POINT-OF-VIEW-SHOT
A shot in which the action is seen from the general perspective of a character.
POST-SYNCHRONIZATION
Adding sound after filming
SCREENPLAY
The literary text of a film to be shot, including dialogue, shot breakdown, stage directions, etc.
SEMIOTICS
The systematic study of signs and their significance.
SEQUENCE
A discernible segment of narrative containing scenes and marking an identifiable dramatic part of the overall story
SHOT
A continuous block of unedited footage from a single point of view
SUBJECTIVE CAMERA
A POINT OF VIEW shot in which the camera seems to become the eyes of a character.
SYNCHRONOUS SOUND
Sound that seems to have a source in the images on screen and in the film’s diegesis.
VOICE-OVER
When the voice of one of the characters speaks over the narrative on the soundtrack, helping to tell the story.
AVANT-GARDE
Cutting edge art, art ahead of its time
BEUR CINEMA
A subgenre of films created by filmmakers of North. These films pose questions about French national cinema and the role of outsiders and insiders in French society.
CINEMA DU LOOK
A style of film-making unique to the 1980s and early 1990s. It is characterized not by any particular politics or ideology, but rather technical mastery of the medium and a spectacular visual style.
FILM NOIR
. A « genre, » first identified by the French, which emerged during and after the
Second World War in America. Characterized by pessimism, visual and moral darkness, an obsession with crime, and extensive use of voice-over.
HERITAGE CINEMA
idealized portrait of an aspect or historical moment in French culture, “nostalgic portrait of a France that is no more,” patrimoine; epic
NEW WAVE CINEMA
A late 1950s/early 1960s movement in French filmmaking led by directors like Godard, Truffaut, Chabrol. New emphasis on the creative role of the director and made frequent use of on location filming, non-professional actors, innovative editing, handheld camerawork.
• Movies featured existential themes, such as stressing the individual and the acceptance of the absurdity of human existence.
• Produced on tight budgets
• Parts of scripts are improvised
• New wave directors often collaborated together
POSTMODERNISM
A cultural style or sensibility, a response to an evolution from modernism, which exhibits disunity, superficiality, parody, irony, indifference, discontinuity, disrespect, alienation, meaninglessness.